mysterious-skin-2004-gregg-araki

Mysterious skin (2004), Gregg Araki

Traumatic experiences in childhood could leave huge impact on adolescence. To many people, it is impossible to escape those haunting memories, especially the intense ones like the early sexual encounter.

Eight-year-old Neil had sex for the first time with his charming coach, and from then on no other man could ever fulfill the void that his coach left in him.

“And I know some people might think it’s fucked up or terrible or whatever, but what happened that summer is a huge part of me. No one ever made me feel that way, before or since. Like, I was, I was special.”

To Brian, five hours of being raped by an adult was so mentally unbearable that he had to conceive of aliens to compensate for it.

The movie theme of pedophilia and child abuse really reminds me of the case of Charles Jouy and Sophie Adam in Foucault’s L’Histoire de la sexualité. What should we really think of people like Neil’s coach? Is pedophile really an identity?

All deviant forms of sexuality posed threats to the status quo. When it comes to laws or policy making, regarding utilitarianism, what matters is the well-being for most, not for all.

To queer people, it can’t be more accurate that hell is others, but that is the inevitable price we must pay for socializing. We should not ask for transgender bathroom; we’d rather ask for other acceptable forms of tolerance. Happiness is yet a small blanket for a great number of people in a freezing winter night; one’s satisfaction is compensated with another’s suffering.

This is why we cannot fully live the way we want to. Suppressing ourselves, or adjusting ourselves is to some extent a must for socialization.

(to be revised)